Restoring Maine's Mightiest River

East Branch Penobscot Jon LuomaJune 11, 2012

Working with the Penobscot Indian Nation and other conservation groups, during three long years of negotiations with the hydro developer, the Penobscot River Restoration Project was born. NRCM was a founding member of the project and played a central role in this effort to improve access to almost 2,000 miles of Maine’s largest river for endangered Atlantic salmon and ten other species of native sea-run fish that feed Maine communities, wildlife, and the Gulf of Maine. 

Photo by Jon Luoma

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Protecting the Moosehead Region

September 23, 2009

In 2005, Plum Creek, a Seattle-based real estate development corporation, put forth the largest development proposal Maine had ever seen—and that would carve the heart out of one of Maine’s most treasured places, Moosehead Lake, a region loved for its remote ponds, undeveloped shorelines, traditional recreation, stunning mountain vistas, and peace and quiet. Plum Creek’s proposal put all of this at risk, calling for 975 house lots, two resorts, a golf course, a marina, three RV parks, and much more, with no plan for additional permanent conservation.

NRCM was the first organization to oppose this plan. We spoke out loud and strong, and so did the people of Maine, including residents of the Moosehead region.

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Protecting Kids from Toxic Chemicals in Consumer Products

child with plastic toysMay 31, 2008

In 2008, NRCM led efforts resulting in passage of the Kid-Safe Products Act (KSPA), establishing a common-sense, science-based system for identifying the “worst of the worst” chemicals, as identified by independent scientists. KSPA requires manufacturers to disclose use of these “priority chemicals” in consumer products and authorizes the State of Maine to require safer alternatives, if available, effective, and affordable. 

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Leading the Way in e-Waste Recycling

electronic wasteJanuary 18, 2006

In 2003, NRCM took on the task of resolving the developing crisis of discarded and highly toxic electronic waste, or “e-waste.” Maine was not the first state to discover it had an e-waste problem but took the lead in finding a workable solution.

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Getting Wyman Station to Clean Up Its Act

Carol Bass with handkerchief at Wyman press conference Aug 2000June 22, 2001

Gazing out across the waters of Casco Bay, a layer of gray soot was almost impossible to miss. It covered boats, moorings, marinas, and was an ominous presence throughout neighborhoods on Cousins Island and beyond. Air pollution, moving on prevailing winds, spewed across the mid-coast to Penobscot Bay, Acadia National Park, and even to Downeast communities. The culprit: Wyman Station power plant on Cousins Island in Yarmouth. 

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Return of the Kennebec

Edwards Dam removalJuly 1, 1999

More than a decade ago local, state, and federal officials, including then–U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, joined staff, board, and members of the Natural Resources Council of Maine and hundreds of other Mainers on the banks of the Kennebec River to witness a landmark occasion: removal of the Edwards Dam in Augusta. It was a ten-year effort sparked by NRCM more than a quarter-century ago. 

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Caribou-Speckled Wilderness

Caribou Speckled WildernessSeptember 19, 1990

In late September, 1990, the United States Congress enacted legislation designating more than 11,000 acres of Maine’s White Mountain National Forest as a permanent Wilderness Area. The Maine Wilderness Act of 1990, which created the Caribou-Speckled Mountain Wilderness Area, was the result of more than seven years of hard work on the part of NRCM and other local, state, and national conservation groups.

Photo by Tony Marple

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Land for Maine’s Future

Black Brook PreserveNovember 3, 1987

The Land for Maine’s Future program was established in 1987 when voters, in response to concerns over the loss of critical natural areas, approved funding to purchase and protect lands important to the history and traditions of the state of Maine. Since then, the program has completed projects in all 16 Maine counties, protecting over 560,000 acres of conservation and recreation lands. These include mountain summits, water access sites, farmland, working waterfronts, and other areas vital to preserving the character of Maine for future generations.

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Pittston Oil Refinery

Passamaquoddy Bay by Jeff Wells 2012 (1)June 17, 1983

Through the Head Harbor Passage, among the legendary swirling tides, powerful currents, and whirlpools of Passamaquoddy Bay sits Eastport, Maine.  It was here in 1973 that a New York-based conglomerate, the Pittston Company, sought to construct a massive marine terminal and crude oil refinery.  The proposed development would have included a 250,000 barrel-per-day refinery, a large crude oil storage facility, and a marine terminal capable of servicing “Very Large Crude Carrier” (VLCC) class oil tankers.

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Billboard Ban: Protecting the Beauty of Maine’s Scenic Highways

Blank billboard in rural areaJanuary 1, 1978

Before passage of pioneering legislation in 1977, Maine highways were lined with billboards advertising everything from motels and car dealerships to cigarettes and junk food. The “billboard ban” law, which took effect on January 1, 1978, slowly worked over many years to decommission and dismantle existing billboard advertisements along major roadways in the state. The final sign, a double-sided billboard in York County, came down in 1984. Today, the scenic landscapes unmarred by gaudy advertisements that unfold for motorists as they cross the state have become, as Dana Connors, president of the Maine State Chamber of Commerce, put it: “part of Maine’s quality of place.”

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Maine’s “Bottle Bill”: Passing and Protecting It

recycling bottlesNovember 2, 1976

In the summer of 1976, Maine Senator Edmund Muskie spoke on the floor of the United States Senate regarding the importance of beverage container redemption legislation. “It is a needed step to assist in developing a ‘conservation ethic’ that rejects waste and embraces thrift, husbandry, and saving part of the Earth’s abundance for our posterity,” he said. That year, NRCM worked hard to secure passage of a “bottle bill” in the Maine Legislature. Angus King, a 31-year-old attorney with a practice in Brunswick, Maine, served as our lobbyist on the issue. Later that year, the voters of Maine approved a referendum measure creating one of the first statewide bottle redemption laws in the country. Prior to the Maine bottle bill passing in the Legislature, beverage containers were the single largest component of roadside litter, marring the natural beauty of Maine and imposing a significant financial burden on the state agencies charged with its collection and disposal. Today, it is estimated that over 90 percent of all eligible containers are redeemed and recycled, all thanks to the success of the “bottle bill” and the “conservation ethic” of the people of Maine.

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Protection of the Allagash, One of Maine’s Exceptional Natural Treasures

Allagash FallsDecember 5, 1966

In Allagash, Maine, near the border with New Brunswick, Canada, a river connects with the St. John, passing through a chain of natural mountain lakes. This river has remained largely unspoiled. In 1857 Henry David Thoreau explored its waters and wrote about them in The Maine Woods. Known today as the Allagash Wilderness Waterway, the river continues to be popular among paddlers looking for a special wilderness experience. They can find it here, thanks to the early work of the Natural Resources Council of Maine.

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